The 2018 Guide to WNBA Team Hashtags

A team’s hashtag on twitter should not be difficult to figure out. A fan of the team should be able to see it used often enough by the official Twitter account of a team that it is obvious that that is the hashtag the team has chosen to use throughout the season. You need something fans can remember, but you also need something that makes sense, and isn’t going to be used by a bunch of random people that have nothing to do with your team. With that said, some teams did well with choosing their hashtags for this season, while others didn’t do so hot. Let’s break it down team by team.

Chicgao Sky is #Skytown

This is a good hashtag, that is unique and localised, and is fairly recognisable as it also contains the team’s name. Thumbs up to Chicago!

Indiana Fever is #GoFever

This is simple, to the point, unique to the team, and easy to remember. This should just be the default Indiana Fever hashtag every year. Thumbs up to Indiana!

Las Vegas Aces are #ALLIN

This is an example of where a team tried to use a hashtag that fits the general idea of the team, but is too broad and used too often elsewhere on Twitter to stand out as unique to the team. I have to hope they come up with something more unique next season. Sorry Aces!

Connecticut Sun is #OrangeInvasion (They also are using #GetSun)

The Sun have done the best job of really promoting this hashtag often and in fun ways, going around town and getting the mascot involved with fans around town, and the fans themselves have caught on and are using the hashtag. The Sun win the award for best job promoting a fun, unique hashtag the fans have embraced!

New York Liberty is #ShowUp

At first glance, this is not a great hashtag, as a few other random people are using it, as would be expected. But the Liberty have got a fun feature that when you use #ShowUp, show and up capitalised, a little Statue of Liberty emoticon gets added to the end. That is a smart move and the Liberty get a thumbs up for using the hashtag often so far this season.

Washington Mystics is #SticsSZN

Washington has embraced the awful yet timely SZN Twitter trend, and they are using it fairly often. It is unique to the team, although a bit confusing if you aren’t already familiar with the team name. All in all a pretty good team hashtag for this season.

Phoenix Mercury is #BeHeard

Another example of a hashtag that at first seems to generic to work, but the Mercury have promoted it enough that the word is out and the team account and fans are using it regularly. It is a good, strong message, so the Mercury get a thumbs up!

Seattle Storm is #WeRepSeattle

Unique, local, and something the team and its fans can rally behind. This is an example of a great hashtag! Thumbs up to the Storm!

Los Angeles Sparks is #GoSparks and #All4LA

Like the Fever’s hashtag the #GoSparks is simple and unique, to the point, while the #All4LA is unique, but unless they promote it really well, won’t quite catch on. I think the Sparks did well by seemingly going with more than one hashtag at the beginning of the season.

Dallas Wings is basically #WatchMeWork or #LetsFly

One fan claimed the Wings hashtag for the season is #LetsFly, and Liz Cambage is the only real tweet I can find with the #LetsFly hashtag being used. Dallas’ latest tweets seem to have no real hashtags used, but occasional they do use the WNBA’s hashtag of “WatchMeWork which has evolved into #WatchUsWork. Either way, Dallas should have done better in picking a unique hashtag coming into this exciting new season for the team.

Atlanta Dream is #OneDream

Atlanta has done a good job promoting this hashtag, but so have a lot of other random sports teams on Twitter. If they keep promoting and using it, they will do okay, but something a bit more specific to the team would have been better.

Minnesota Lynx is #GetUp

The Lynx win the award for the most generic hashtag possible. And despite doing a press release telling everyone that this is in fact the hashtag for the Lynx this season, it has not caught on, and is being used by anyone and everyone across twitter, and they are not promoting the Minnesota Lynx when they use it, unfortunately. Despite promoting it well so far, I have to give this hashtag a thumbs down for being too generic and overused.

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2018 Seattle Storm Season Preview

The Seattle Storm have two of the best young players in the league. Can they continue to build around them and make a bigger playoff push this season?

The Top 20 WNBA Players in 2018

Who are the best players in the WNBA at the moment? Who, based on last season’s statistics and the outlook towards the beginning of the 2018 season, are the top individuals in the league? I looked at the top ten players in each of the following categories: points per game, rebounds per game, assists per game, steals per game, blocks per game, 3 point %, true shooting %, offensive rating, defensive rating, and PERs. I made a spreadsheet of all the categories, then determined how many total categories each player had been in the top ten last year. I didn’t give a weighted bias towards any category, but I did do side by side comparison when two players were in multiple different categories, and tried to judge fairly based on overall importance. There were certainly surprises, while other players obviously did well in many categories. With that said, there are a couple of players who did not play at all last season, but merit mention and consideration: Angel McCoughtry and Chiney Ogwumike. Do they make the list? Scroll down to find out!

20. Alyssa Thomas – 6’2′ Forward, Connecticut Sun

AlyssaThomas

Alyssa Thomas was an important part of the young and talented Connecticut Sun that had a breakout season last year. She was in the top ten in assists and steals per game, but was also 9th and 10th respectively in defensive and total rebounds. She averaged a career high 14.8 ppg last season, but one thing she’ll have to work on is her turnovers. She more than anyone else in the league last year at 98.

19. Allie Quigley – 5’10” Guard, Chicago Sky

AllieQuigley

Allie Quigley is a sharpshooter. She was in the top ten of both true shooting percentage and 3 point shooting percentage, and she also won last year’s 3 point contest at her first All-Star Game appearance. A two-time 6th woman of the year, she continues to help lead a Chicago team that is looking to get back to the playoffs in 2018.

18. Elizabeth Williams – 6’3″ Center/Forward, Atlanta Dream

EWilliams

Elizabeth Williams was one of the Dream’s 3 All-Stars last season, and she was in the top ten in both rebounds per game and blocks per game. If she can continue to rebound and block well, she may not need to improve all that much in the scoring department because she will have plenty of other scoring options around her on a Dream team loaded with A LOT of talent this upcoming season.

17. Sue Bird – 5’9″ Guard, Seattle Storm

SueBird

Bird is a legend of the game, but even at the age of 37 she continues to play very well. She was in the top ten in both assists per game and 3 point percentage last season, and any team in the league would take her for skills at running the point, finding open players, shooting well, and overall leadership.

16. Diana Taurasi – 5′ 11′ Guard, Phoenix Mercury

DianaTaurasi

Taurasi, like Bird, is one of the best to ever play in the WNBA. Last season was not her best, but she was still in the top ten in points per game, and is capable of completely taking over any single game at any time. Has she lost a step with age, like Sue Bird? Yes, but not enough that Phoenix would ever think of trading her. The Mercury need her experience and her leadership every game, especially come playoff time.

15. Jewell Loyd – 5’10” Guard, Seattle Storm

JewellLoyd

Loyd was Rookie of the Year in 2014-15, and she continues to grow as one of the best guards and overall players in the league. She was in the top ten in points per game last year, and she had a PER of 19.1. She was also in the top ten in total points and total 3 point field goals. She has improved year by year in her early career, and looks to only get better this season as well.

14. Jasmine Thomas – 5’9″ Guard, Connecticut Sun

JasmineThomas

Another integral piece of the Connecticut Sun’s great season last year, she was top ten in assists per game, steals per game, and 3 point percentage. She was also 3rd in minutes played and 6th in minutes per game, and she averaged a good 14.1 points per game. Another young talented guard, she plays well on both ends of the floor for a young, uptempo team that is really looking forward to being one of the top teams in the league once again this season.

13. Stefanie Dolson – 6’5″ Center, Chicago Sky

StefanieDolson

Dolson was part of the blockbuster trade that sent Elena Delle Donne to the Mystics and moved Dolson and Kahleah Copper (and the 2nd pick which was Alaina Coates) to Chicago. Dolson is one of the best young centers in the game, and her top tens in blocks per game, true shooting percentage, and 3 point shooting percentage means she can play inside and out. She is quite a versatile big, and if she can continue to increase her scoring, as well as improve her rebounding, she will really be a force to be reckoned with not only this season, but in years to come.

12. Chelsea Gray – 5’11” Guard, Los Angeles Sparks

ChelseaGray

Runner-up for last year’s Most Improved Player award, Chelsea Gray is thriving in Los Angeles since her trade from Connecticut in 2016. She was top ten last year in assists, 3 point percentage (she ranked first at 48%), true shooting percentage, and offensive rating. She has come into her own as the new starting point guard on arguably the most individually talented team in the league. After Kristi Toliver left for Washington, Gray stepped into the role as the Sparks floor general, and has really improved, especially in her scoring, where she went from 5.9 off the bench in 2016, to 14.8 as a starter last season. She passes well, she shoots the 3 as well as anyone, and she has great court vision.

11. Angel McCoughtry – 6’1″ Forward, Atlanta Dream

AngelMcCoughtry

A former Rookie of the Year in 2009, McCoughtry will look to continue to lead the Atlanta Dream as a two way player who can score as well as very few others in the league can. She is a perennial MVP candidate, and she was top ten in points per game and steals per game in her most recent season in 2016. She sat out 2017 to rest, but the team made big strides last year and during this offseason. She will certainly come back to the Dream this season ready to get back to the Finals for a 4th time, and ready to battle anyone else in the league.

10. Tina Charles – 6’4″ Center, New York Liberty

TinaCharles

Tina Charles at age 29 has been one of the most consistent players during her 8 years in the WNBA. Rookie of the Year in 2010 and MVP in 2012, she continued her excellent play in 2017 as she was 3rd in points per game, and 4th in rebounds per game. Her blocking ability has steadily declined since she first arrived in the league. But her assists have improved over the years, which will need to continue as her usage percentage was 1st in the league. She scored more total points than anyone else last year, but in reality that means that the offence relies too heavily on her and her alone. She will need another star or two on her team before she breaks through to the Finals or a championship.

9. Skylar Diggins-Smith – 5’9″ Guard, Dallas Wings

SkylarDigginsSmith

Skylar Diggins-Smith is a player that continues to lead as a classic point guard, with top tens in points per game, assists per game, offensive rating, and PER last season. She heads a Dallas Wings full of young and veteran talent, and as a leader on this team, will look to get back to the playoffs as she got to play in her first playoff game just last year. She has overcome a tough rookie season to become Most Improved Player in 2014, and an ACL tear in 2015 that has seen her bounce back and grow into possibly the best point guard in the league.

8. Candace Parker – 6’4″ Forward, Los Angeles Sparks

CandaceParker

Rookie of the Year and 2 time MVP Candace Parker continued to prove why she is one of the best players in the league. She was 11th in points per game, and in the top ten in assists per game, steals per game, blocks per game, defensive rating, and PER. Like Tina Charles, she has been consistently excellent throughout her career. She has more talent around than probably anyone else in the league right now, but she works hard every game to be her best and make her teammates better. Much like the rest of the players on the list, any team would absolutely love to have Parker starting for them.

7. Breanna Stewart – 6’4 Forward, Seattle Storm

BreannaStewart

Breanna Stewart is easily one of the most exciting and exceptional players the league has had in some time. She unanimously won Rookie of the Year and was Defensive Player of the Year runner up in 2016. She continued to meet and exceed expectations in her sophomore season in 2017. She made the All-Star team and was 2nd in the league in points per game, and 6th in both blocks and rebounds per game. She has a real opportunity to continue her young partnership with Jewell Loyd, much like Sue Bird and Lauren Jackson did in Seattle before her, to create a title winning franchise in the Emerald City.

6. Jonquel Jones – 6’6″, Forward/Center, Connecticut Sun

JonquelJones

Jonquel Jones did some incredible things last season as a second year player. She won the Most Improved Player award, set three single season rebounding records, and was top ten in rebounds per game, blocks per game, 3 point shooting, true shooting percentage, offensive rating, defensive rating, and last but not least (or maybe least depending on your opinion of it) PER. Like Stewart, she is one of the best young talents in the league who has shown that she can really stack up against anyone else in the WNBA. She can shoot the 3, score in the paint, is probably already the best rebounder in the league. She has a ton of talent around her, has a great head coach in Curt Miller, and I hope she continues to play even better in 2018. I honestly debated whether or not to put her first on this list. Maybe next year!

5. Brittney Griner – 6’8″ Center, Phoenix Mercury

BrittneyGriner

Two time Defensive Player of the Year Brittney Griner is another really amazing talent. She was in the top ten in 6 categories last year: points per game, rebounds per game, blocks per game, true shooting percentage, offensive rating, and PER. She battle the injury bug last season, but I expect her to come back even hungrier than ever. She is, like the forwards and centers before and after her on this list, simply outstanding offensively and defensively in the paint. She commands respect, and she earns respect with every block and every post move that leads to an easy two points. Watch out for BG in 2018.

4. Elena Delle Donne – 6’5″ Guard/Forward, Washington Mystics

ElenaDelleDonne

Rookie of the Year in 2013 and MVP in 2015, Elena Delle Donne is the most versatile player in the league. At 6’5″, she can play any position on the court, and she can score from anywhere on the court as well. She was top ten last year in points per game, blocks per game, 3 point percentage, true shooting percentage, offensive rating, and PER. Her move to the Mystics got her closer to her home state of Delaware in a system that seems to fit well so far. And though she has battled Lyme disease, and a spell of other injuries, when she is healthy she is the biggest threat offensively in the league. She was also tied for 12th in rebounds with Alyssa Thomas, which goes to show that along with her other top ten finishes, she really is the complete package. Look to see her push this Mystics team harder and further in 2018.

3. Maya Moore – 6’0″ Forward, Minnesota Lynx

MayaMoore

Maya Moore has been the best player in the league most of her career. Rookie of the Year in 2011 and MVP in 2014, she had bit of and down year, but in reality, that means she was still better than most everyone else in the league. And that’s why I also expect her to bounce back this season and as good or better than ever before. Maya Moore does it all on both ends of the floor, and like the rest of the top ten, knows how to lead a team, how to make her teammates better, and how to take over a game in a flash. Winning her 4th title with the Lynx last season, she was top ten in points per game, steals per game, 3 point percentage, offensive and defensive ratings, and PER. Crazy to think there was actually a better player on her own team last season…

2. Nneka Ogwumike, 6’2″ Forward, Los Angeles Sparks

NnekaOgwumike

What can I say about Nneka Ogwumike that hasn’t already been said? She is another player that truly excels on both ends of the floor, every single game. She was top ten in points per game, rebounds per game, steals per game, true shooting percentage, offensive and defensive rating, and PER. She had one of the most efficient shooting seasons in basketball history in her MVP and title winning season in 2016. At 27 she is in her prime, and she is playing along side some of the best talent in the league. She has been to back to back Finals the past two seasons, and no one will be surprised if they are back for a third time in 2018. Ogwumike has to be as motivated as ever to win more championships, and I believe she will continue to be one of the best, if not the best player in the league this next season.

1. Sylvia Fowles, 6’6″ Center, Minnesota Lynx

fowles

I really debated with myself for a long time on who to put first on this list. Nneka and Sylvia are both just about equals in mind. They have both absolutely dominated the league the past couple of seasons. But I put Sylvia first because I believe that as hungry and Nneka is for her 2nd championship, Sylvia Fowles is just as hungry for her 3rd. She was astounding last season, in the regular season and in the playoffs, winning MVP and Finals MVP. Not unlike many of the great centers the WNBA, Lauren Jackson, Lisa Leslie, and Yolanda Griffith, Fowles uses her size and ability inside to destroy opponents on both ends of the floor. She was top ten in points per game, rebounds per game, blocks per game, true shooting, offensive and defensive ratings, and had the best PER out of anyone else in the league. As far as her top tens go, she was 1st in blocks per, rebounds per, defensive rating, and of course PER. She was also 1st in offensive win shares, defensive win shares, overall win shares, win shares per 48 minutes, offensive and defensive rebounding percentage, effective field goal percentage, field goal percentage, 2 point field goal percentage, and total offensive rebounds. That is a lot of firsts in a lot of categories, and Sylvia Fowles proved that any way you look at it, she was the best player in the league, both offensively and defensively in 2017. And I am betting, even at age 32, she is ready to prove that once again in 2018.

Conclusion

So, Angel McCoughtry made the list, but Chiney, along with a host of other players, did not. Am I crazy? Was this list great, good, bad, or just plain wrong? Does Layshia Clarendon, Kayla McBride, Lindsay Whalen or anyone belong on this list instead? Hit me up on Twitter and let me know, and thanks for reading!

WNBA Awards Season

With the regular season over yesterday, the WNBA moves into the playoffs, and with that, comes awards season. The Most Improved Player award is probably the one I had the most trouble with, and the most fun choosing. After crunching the numbers, I found myself with a real dilemma. Atlanta’s Elizabeth Williams improved her game averages from last season with the Sun in points, rebounds, assists, and steals (not including her vast improvement in blocks) by a whopping 228%.

The Mystics Tayler Hill improved in the same statistical categories by 112%, and the Liberty’s Sugar Rodgers, along with last year’s rookie of the year, Seattle’s Jewell Loyd, both improved by 72.5 and 73% respectively.

So, the raw numbers tell us that Elizabeth Williams is by far the most improved player of 2016, right? Well, when I also calculated their individual increases in minutes per game, I saw that Williams increased her minutes by 192%, while Hill’s minutes increased by 72.3%, Rodgers increased by 66.8%, but Loyd’s minutes only increased by 23%. And all four players are playing pretty similar minutes this year, about 30, with Williams with the most at 34 per game.

So the question became, how do I reconcile a player’s improved stat line, when they’ve had a much greater increase in minutes to do it in, especially when you compare Williams with Loyd? I wondered, well, an increase in minutes could be because they steadily improved, and so they deserved more minutes, or they simply got more minutes because of a trade or injury to a starting player. A trade was the case with Williams, as she played a backup role in Connecticut last year, but got a starting role in Atlanta’s lineup this year. Either way, I never quite figured out how to compare the stats percentages with the minutes percentages. I figured someone else has already done this for me, say with Hollingers’s PER, but I’m still not certain if this kind of stat reflects the question I was asking myself. I am by no means a stats guru, and I was always terrible at math, but the older I have gotten the more I have enjoyed statistics and crunching simple numbers. So I just decided I would divide the average percentage of stats by the player’s percentage in increased minutes and make that a ratio. Again, perhaps I’m a simpleton when it comes to stats and this is something already in existence, but bear with me. The ratios that I came up when I did the division surprised me, as Loyd, despite the more modest increase in stats, seemingly improved at a better rate, or at least did so in less time than the other 3 players:

Stats% to Minutes Increased% Ratio:

Elizabeth Williams: 1.188

Tayler Hill: 1.556

Sugar Rodgers: 1.085

Jewell Loyd: 3.108

Is this kind of ratio absurd? Does it make any sense, or no sense at all? Is it already accounted for or dismissed by some Sports Stats Guru at ESPN? I honestly have no idea. But after looking at the players’ PER numbers from last year to this year, I am still not sure if there is a correlation of some kind, or if I simply have no idea what I am talking about. Obviously in this day and age of advanced stats, we can adjust the expectations we have for a player based on PACE, based on starting and bench roles, based on position, based on so many factors, so I still don’t know what to think of ratio I came up with.

Williams PER from last year to this year went from 17.9 to 15.6, Hill went from 13.5 to 17, Rodgers went from 14.1 to 15.3, while Loyd went from 14 to 18.3.  So, maybe there is a correlation, maybe there is none at all. But in trying to reconcile the idea of a player improving less, but seemingly more with the less increased time they had to do it in, I came to the conclusion, that ultimately, I can’t fault a player like Elizabeth Williams for getting more minutes, or getting traded into a starting role on a different team. I can’t really figure out if she got more minutes because she steadily put up better numbers, or if she put up better numbers simply because she had more minutes. I can only applaud her for her vast improvement in basically every major stat category, and on both ends of the floor. So in the end, I have to pick Elizabeth Williams as Most Improved Player of 2016.

Coach of the Year, for me, goes to Brian Agler and the part that he has played in turning the Sparks around this season. Everyone has stepped up this season on this roster, but the coaching staff has to be recognised for a job well done as well. This Sparks team has in my view played above and beyond, not perhaps their talent or potential, but certainly beyond the expectations I had for them at the beginning of the season. But do I think Coach Agler will win? No, I have no doubt it will go to Cheryl Reeve, who has done just as excellent a job as Agler, and who’s team is primed and ready to tie the Houston Comets for the record 4 WNBA titles.

Sixth Woman of the Year is without a doubt going to be Jantel Lavender. She had some pretty good competition in rookie Aerial Powers of the Dallas Wings, and Shavonte Zellous of the Liberty, but she was simply outstanding off the bench for the Sparks this season.

Rookie of the Year may well be a unanimous vote with Seattle’s #1 pick Breanna Stewart. Former UConn teammate Moriah Jefferson, now of San Antonio, Chicago’s Imani Boyette, Dallas’s Aerial Powers, and Indiana’s Tiffany Mitchell all had good rookie seasons, but they are all essentially in a race for second place.

Defensive Player of the Year is a category that is a tough choice, because I have to say the Breanna Stewart, along with the ROY award, probably also deserves this one as well. Who’s lead the league in defensive rebounds? Stewart. Who was third in block shots? Stewart. Who just set the record for most defensive rebounds in a season? Stewart. What’s more important than blocks, especially blocks that simply stop play, go out of bounds and keep the ball in the other team’s end of the floor? Defensive rebounds.

That brings us to the final award category: Most Valuable Player. Who’s my pick? Nneka Ogwumike of the Los Angeles Sparks. Why? Because 6 Western Conference Player of the Week awards, 2 Western Conference Player of the Month awards, a season PER of 31.4, and an effective field goal percentage of .687, that’s why, Tina Charles. Sorry. I love you Tina, but Nneka is taking this one this year.

So those are my picks. I hope I haven’t disappointed or infuriated you too much. Stay tuned for a playoff preview!

The Season So Far

With a little over a month of basketball already played including preseason, the league is starting to take shape, and there are certainly a few surprises that I doubt many folks saw coming. And of course a few not so surprising things to take into consideration as well. I want to look simply at teams as whole, rather than individual players.

First, most surprising of all is the Los Angeles Sparks. They are still tied with the other best team in the league, Minnesota at 8-0. The Sparks are team that looks like they are loving playing together, and have some of the best all around talent in the league. Despite their youth, I won’t be surprised if they keep up with the Lynx and contend for a Finals appearance, or at least battle in the Conference Finals. Another interesting surprise is that no other team in the West has a winning record. Maybe that is because of how well the Lynx and Sparks are playing, but we should also consider how inter-conference play, new this season, is affecting both conferences. Sure, the West has only two winning teams, but in the East only the Dream have a winning record, while the Sky, Liberty and Fever sit at 4-4. I would honestly venture to say that inter-conference play is separating the contenders from the non-contenders sooner than expected, but it is also still early in the season. Nevertheless, the fact that Minnesota is 8-0 does not surprise at all, while that fact that the Sun are 1-7 does. The Sun, with the talent they already had, as well as the talent they drafted, look like a team with a lot more growing and learning to do.

So, Connecticut is disappointing, but the Mercury and the Mystics are as well. If any of these three teams can really turn it around, I’d say it’s Phoenix, but it simply may not be their year. Their biggest rival Minnesota looks so good, and so does Los Angeles, that it appears to be another two-horse race in the West like last season, only it’s the Sparks instead of the Mercury. The rest of the West, although maybe unable to keep up with Lynx or Sparks, still look to provide some very entertaining moments this year. The Storm look promising with a VERY dynamic duo in Lloyd and Stewart, the Wings look like they could possibly do some damage if they can get Skylar Diggins healthy this season, but once again San Antonio looks destined for another single digit number of wins season.

In the East, the Dream are the pleasant surprise that many in Atlanta have been hoping for. Like Los Angeles, Atlanta looks like a team with chemistry and a real desire to win now rather than hope for a success later.  Angel McCoughtry continues to lead her team and has a good group of players around her that are contributing well and having fun doing so. The other team of note is the Liberty. They have shown flashes of last year’s regular season toughness and ability, but are going to have to find answers fast if they want to stick around come playoff time. The same could be said for Chicago and Indiana, but it will be interesting if anyone will really compete with the Lynx the rest of the season. They are so talented, so deep, and have so much experience these past several seasons, I think only major injuries are going to stop them from winning another title this year. As for the rest of the East, the Mystics and Sun look like almost wrecked ships even well before the All-Star Game. But can Atlanta, New York, or the Sparks get  close to an upset like Indiana last year, or even do the Fever one better and topple the league’s best team? My advice is to simply stay tuned and above all else, enjoy some great basketball.

 

Draft ’16 Winners and Losers

After last night’s draft, the question is, “Who won and who lost?” Well, I can say without question the long term winners of the draft are the Connecticut Sun. Not only did they already have a chance at winning the draft with picks 3 and 4, with which they took UConn Forward Morgan Tuck and Minnesota Guard Rachel Banham, they worked a trade with the Sparks and got George Washington Forward Jonquel Jones as the 6th pick. They also got Oregon State Guard Jamie Weisner and St. John’s guard Aliyyah Handford in 2nd and 3rd rounds. Sure, Seattle comes away with Breanna Stewart, consensus #1 and a possible league MVP in the coming years, but you have to admit that with with the picks the Sun got in this draft, as well as years past, they are officially stacked with talent, not to mention a promising new head coach in Curt Miller.

So who were the losers in this year’s draft? Honestly, I don’t think any single team lost out this year. The Sparks were the team I thought missed out on a great player in Jones, but they traded for Chelsea Gray, one of the best young point guards in the league. All in all I think every team league wide added depth and talent, and every young team looking to make the playoffs continued to bolster their rosters. I have to say that is what may be the most intriguing thing about the league this year: the parity of young talent that every single team seems to have right now. This draft was a deep one and in my mind only helped to continue to grow the talent around the WNBA. Every fan base in the the league should be excited about the players they now have thanks to not only this year’s draft but the past few drafts as well.